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TOPIC: Visually creative careers - What do you do?

Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 3 months ago #4152

  • Aphantelica
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I'm curious how many Aphantasics have a visually creative career (Graphic/Web Designer, Industrial Designer, Visual Artist, Architect, etc) that involves making 'visual' based decisions.

I'm a Geoscientist by profession, but recently started studying graphic design. As I'm unable to visualise, all my design related decisions are based on what 'feels' right, using Intuition. (I'm a myers briggs INFP) I'm interested to know what line of visually creative work people are in, and how they go about making their 'visual' decisions?
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 3 months ago #4198

  • jody
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I do lots of stuff...

I do graphic design - flyers, postcards, websites etc..

I have a small independent publishing house.

I renovate property and then either sell it or rent it out

And I'm just about to start a Masters in Psychology.

I wouldn't say I was visually creative, but I can put together a visually appealing website that is extremely functional. I have very little imagination, but recognise a good story when I read a submission and I love putting old houses back together again.

Help much?
Shit - if only I'd known!
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 3 months ago #4201

  • Aphantelica
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Interesting. Thanks for the reply.

Sounds like your a creative all rounder :)

I'm keen to hear as many stories as possible. Everything helps.

Thanks again Jody. All the best with your masters.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 2 months ago #4377

  • Yvonne
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Hi....I'm a hairdresser...people can't understand how I can create without having a finished product in mind....I can see what the client looks like now and what is out of balance ,I have technical skills that I use to change that.....but I don't have a visual of what the finished product will be....sometimes " a picture is worth a thousand words "....lol
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 1 month ago #4451

  • Konstantin
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I have been working as web designer for several years, also using my intuition for everything (+ what can be learned and/or calculated like proportions, spaces, etc.) - i have never considered myself a good one but feedback was always ok, no one would tell that i have aphantasia, actually i have always been expected to also work in the creative processes even when i was mainly coding at a company. I have tried to start drawing with hands many times but gave up every time rather quickly. I can draw cartoon like stuff and wireframes okay, but nothing else. I remember i always needed to start drawing the actual elements to be able to see them and continue designing from there - never saw the whole picture in my mind before it was finished, only the abstract requirements.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 1 month ago #4457

  • AlanC
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I programmed computers before I retired. I have programmed many kinds of programs from insurance, to tool control, databases, pretty much anything that was developed in the last 40 years. There was only one job that I found really difficult. That was when I was programming games, in this case slot machines. As various events happened the program had to play various dings, and beeps, and little riffs. I was always getting the wrong sound associated with the event. I could not hear the difference between one beep and another (and there were dozens of different beeps and buzzes and clicks on every spin. I arranged those sounds by their graphical representation in the sound editor but I never really got the hang of it. I moved on to other types of programming.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 1 month ago #4526

  • JOHNNEL
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i have been hand making electric guitars from scratch_ie the raw wood to finished i have also for many years been a carpenter and bespoke artists frame maker, in my youth i run an apprentice safety magazine being responsible for art content. lately, I'm 62,i have been honing my skills with a pencil and am now able to copy freehand any photo image i desire with a fairly high degree of accuracy, it took two years to accomplish it at 4 hours practice a day 5 days a week.i hope this adds to the insight being developed here, any questions please reply.jon
Last Edit: 1 year 1 month ago by JOHNNEL. Reason: autocorrect error
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 1 month ago #4586

  • wannes
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I studied to be a product designer and did some graphic design.
For graphic design, I would say I don't have the result in mind, but use a trial and error technique. I make several alternatives, pick the one I like the best and continue with that. This is feasible because computer work allows to make different alternatives quickly. For placement of items often I just play around until I like the way it looks.
For product design; I'm mostly a fan of 'minimalist' design, possibly because these kind of objects are easy to imagine without seeing them. If I design something myself, I tend to have some idea of what the end result should be: an idea of shape, proportions and combination of materials/colors. I trust my feeling/intuition on building this first idea. I do some tweaking afterwards, or change things in a second version: if you make version one it's possible for me to assess which aspects I do/don't like.

Lately I'm doing a lot of photography. That’s ‘easy’ for me because I can actually see the image in reality and just take the shot. I work analogue and the aperture/shutter speed is something of which I can rationally ‘overlay’ the effects on the image I see through the lens. Maybe it’s even easier to judge lighting etc. if you don’t have other images in your mind to distract you? I realise my photography is very ‘aesthetic’ (which might be very personal) - I try to capture the poetry of a moment and never really want to tell a story.

Possibly that’s also the reason why I don’t have the patience to do things like painting: without being able to create an image of the end result, all I see is just a shitty half painted something. I don’t have the patience to use the trial and error technique for painting, it’s too frustrating - maybe because in graphic design i work with elements that have an ‘aesthetic’ value already (words, images, basic shapes) while painting works with ‘smaller elements’ without value (strokes, dots, …)?
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 1 month ago #4587

  • Malkierian
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I, too, am a trial-and-error creator. I've had to do some web design for the web applications I've developed recently, and I usually have to have an existing theme to go off of in order to generate the theme I want. When I don't, it often takes a long time to get the end result I want because I have to go in, change something, change it again if I don't like it, etc, instead of being able to say "I want this color here, this image there, that text block here" in my mind and then translate it into layout code.

I've always wanted to get into personal photos because I've known for a while that I otherwise wouldn't be able to remember things that are happening later on. Recently I have also gotten into photography, and am getting more professional with it, but I have to have people act as they would and snap photos and then pick the ones I liked later. I'm not able to see a person and go "oh, they would look good in this pose" because I have no internal frame of reference. It makes me want to do property and landscape photos much more.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 2 weeks ago #4675

  • Robert
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I was trained to be an architect, and had no problem with generating creative ideas, plotting them out, rendering them, and so on. Just don't ask me to span a beam! I haven't worked in that profession for more than 25 years, but that's because the profession is completely different from what most architecture students (including myself) think they're getting into.

For most of the past 25 years, I've been an antiques/art/collectibles dealer, and estate liquidator. There's not a lot of visual creativity involved in that realm.

For 7 or 8 of those years, I was also creating visual art and having exhibitions, but the artworks were conceptually-driven sculpture and installation art. Developing each work was a process that began with generating and developing ideas, before the aesthetics were brought in. I never had any problem doing this, but I very much had to work everything out on paper, rather than visualizing it as images in my mind.

It's a difficult process for me to articulate; at some point, language ceases to be useful.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 1 year 1 week ago #4714

  • Sekhmet
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I'm an artist and I work in games doing 2-D animation, illustration and user interface design. Went to college for animation + illustration and never realized I couldn't picture things in my head like the other students. I think there are both upsides and downsides to being an artist with Aphantasia.
Art has always been my outlet since 1st grade. I was the go to girl for mermaid drawings back then.

Also for a hobby I make jewelry and costume type clothing.

My personal art aimeeseaver.blogspot.com/
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 9 months 2 weeks ago #4988

  • Lynzard
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What it's Like to Have Aphantasia

I'm a cake decorator and went to art school for graphic design. I found this article pretty relatable as far as my process goes.

I find it easier to recreate something from a picture, but I have an understanding of shapes and proportions and that allows me to create drawings from my "imagination", I just think about it in words and feelings instead of pictures and translate that onto whatever canvas I'm using. I don't really have anything to compare it to or a way to understand how other artists think while they work, it may be more difficult for me or it could be easier. I have a feeling it's some of both and I think that's true for most creative pursuits no matter how your brain works . Hope this is helpful.
Last Edit: 9 months 2 weeks ago by Lynzard.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 2 months 2 weeks ago #39434

  • Kc99
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I love art and love creating art .. and I think that is quite common with people that have aphantasia because we are already lacking in imagination so we have the want to create stuff that is not necessarily normal for us

Personally my dream job is to be a tattoo artist , love the thought of my creations being on people forever instead of on a wall.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 5 days 8 hours ago #39645

  • Deletrea
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I am a teacher by trade, but have worked for a decade in different ceramic painting shops (I do custom work.). I'm also a quilter (almost 14 years). I can't picture the final product, but I do a lot of manipulating things before I start the project. I have patterns for quilts and tape a small piece of the fabric next to the directions so I can remember which is which. Some times I'll draw out the quilt or scan it and then alter the colors to get a better sense of color and balance. When I'm doing custom work, I draw out or find something similar and then piece things together, then I can smooth out the design before I start on the actual piece. When I used to make my own ceramics, it was easy because I was manipulating as I went. Sometimes I wold run out of materials because I couldn't visually estimate, but eventually I get a "feel" for how much of something I need. I also tend to over-buy on materials just to be save.

I think it's been helpful to have so many computer programs that I can use to scan, manipulate, and edit ideas before I start on the project. Then I keep a printed copy with the project as I work on it.
I'm never disappointed in how a book character looks in the movie adaptation.
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Visually creative careers - What do you do? 5 days 17 minutes ago #39647

  • DeathWhinny
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I'm a web developer, which occasionally means I am called on to make design decisions - it is something I have never enjoyed and I always push to have a 'proper' designer make decisions but in pinch I will rely on functional UX concepts, intuition and trial and error to get something that works well enough.
As many here seem to find, I can identify a good or poor design once it is created but having a concept of what something will look like before I have made it is beyond me.
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