Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Running D&D

Running D&D 1 year 4 months ago #4044

  • andItsPeter
  • andItsPeter's Avatar
  • Offline
  • New Aphantasiac
  • Posts: 12
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Can't believe I'm admitting this to a group of random people on the internet.
:blush:

But I run a D&D (Dungeons and Dragons, yes, the nerd game)
And so for that I create the world, a story in it, and the other characters (NPCs) and play as them.

I have a world map I've created, and a story for towns and people in them.


(I don't know if this qualifies, so remove it if it doesn't)
Picture it...
how?
Last Edit: 1 year 4 months ago by andItsPeter.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Running D&D 1 year 4 months ago #4062

  • Sunomis
  • Sunomis's Avatar
  • Offline
  • New Aphantasiac
  • Posts: 6
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 1
Hi! There is nothing wrong with being a nerd. It has become quite chic nowadays ;)

I do not run D&D games myself, but I GM other games (namely Call of Cthulhu and Guildes). I have found that I am much better at running stories that I have created, than using commercial stories. Maybe this is because I love to improvise a lot :)

Anyways. As you may understand, I tend to be very bad at describing the world visually. A typical conversation with my players can be :
- What does this guy look like ?
- Err, he has ... brown hair ?

I think, by now, my players understand that they can imagine whatever they want, and they do it quite well. If they enter the room, for example, I give the technical details that are necessary for the story (i.e : the cavers is a hundred foot wide, and is lit by strangely glowing mushrooms), and they build visual impressions around it. They create the looks of the characters themselves, etc...

However, I have learned to cope with my inability to visualize, and I give them a lot of other cues, like sounds and odors of even textures. In hindsight, it is probable that my aphantasic condition has made a good GM out of me, as the worlds I create are very sensual.

I am curious to know : do you only lack a mind's eye, or also a mind's ear and nose or skin ? How do you cope with it in order to create a living world that will engage your players ?
Last Edit: 1 year 4 months ago by Sunomis.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Running D&D 1 year 4 months ago #4070

  • andItsPeter
  • andItsPeter's Avatar
  • Offline
  • New Aphantasiac
  • Posts: 12
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Sunomis wrote:
I am curious to know : do you only lack a mind's eye, or also a mind's ear and nose or skin ? How do you cope with it in order to create a living world that will engage your players ?

I have no inner senses, so it's fun to try and describe people, my current group are good with simpler descriptions of places and people, however I try to run through the senses one by one to help me describe. I mostly make up for that by trying to have my world be as "real" as possible so, for example, I have a map printed upon which I have the country's trade mapped out, so I can work that into stories and conversations.

Also a lot of preplanning, not for the people they will meet, but the locations that they will encounter so I can properly describe them, but I do occasionally describe something, then realise that it was a terrible description.

But as I write this I've decided that a good idea would probably be to have a list of the senses next to me so I can force myself to run through them for each major description of a place.


(Also stealing descriptions is very useful)
Picture it...
how?
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.132 seconds